Blog Archives

Linux Adobe

SVG Logo of Inkscape

Inkscape Logo

As my skills in web development, well, develop, I find it more difficult to work without software packages like the Adobe suites. Web Design Premium or Master Collection, I learn and use many of the pieces with each other. The primary difference between Adobe products and their open source alternatives are the lack of interaction between. Take the popular graphics alternative for Photoshop: GIMP. Now take the web development alternatives for Dreamweaver: Netbeans, Aptana Studio, or Bluefish*. What about the vector graphics alternative for Illustrator: Inkscape? All of these products alone provide comparable service with their Adobe doppelgängers, yet I don’t see Inkscape working with Bluefish, nor do I see it work with GIMP. It’s the interoperability that the open source versions lack, and that’s quite an important part!

Just today I went to a barbecue my friend was hosting and talked to a telecommunications major with whom I am also friends. He discussed taking a web development course this summer and how he took Photoshop files and exported them to Dreamweaver. He didn’t have to touch one bit of the code menu in designing for iWeb server, which is free web hosting offered to students here at Ball State. I’ve heard other examples of people exporting from Fireworks into Dreamweaver so they can focus more on the design, rather than spending hours getting the code to display exactly how you want. I get the feeling this is completely foreign to many open source advocates, since they still push the idea of using the alternatives.

The next generation of open source projects is starting to get the right idea. Take BlueGriffin for example. They create a WYSIWYG editor with a code view, based on the same Gecko rendering engine that Firefox 4 uses, and add built-in SVG-editing software. Is it Inkscape? No. Is this package perfect? Not by any means, but it’s a step in the right direction. BlueGriffin edits SVG files with another open source software, SVG Edit. The reason I’m not supporting this project more is because (a) I just learned about it while researching for this post, and (b) the developers charge for most of the useful add-ons. One of the major add-ons I see as a contributor for BlueGriffin being a Dreamweaver replacement is the ActiveView. It automatically synchronizes the Gecko-rendered WYSIWYG view with the code view. This is comparable to using Firefox’s extension Firebug to do a more permanent edit of the HTML and CSS. It would also be a great asset for those trying to learn HTML since they could toy with the appearance to understand how it changes the code. Another significant add-on is an adapted version of FireFTP, which increases the potential of adding similar website synchronization as Dreamweaver has had.

Adobe Dreamweaver

Dreamweaver CS5

Still these are just strides in the correct direction. What I would like to see within the next major revision of GIMP, Inkscape, and Bluefish is cooperation. I want to see GIMP output a file as HTML and automatically open it in Bluefish for editing. I want to see Bluefish edit an embedded SVG file by opening Inkscape. I am aware of some capabilities Bluefish has, however it shouldn’t only be up to Bluefish to bridge the gap. The individual projects are pieces that don’t yet completely fit together, but I feel they will soon.

Still, Adobe is about more than just web design; they also focus on video editing, flash programming, and more. We need to see some more of our renowned cooperation in the world of open source to truly offer the “open source alternative.”

* Bluefish wasn’t originally in my top choices for a Dreamweaver replacement, but upon further inspection I see how its features have changed since I last used it. I can also see this project being more useful than Komposer, and would like to see a few more features be merged before I’ll fully adopt it: (1) Cleaner WYSIWYG editing; (2) Using Firefox 4′s Gecko rendering engine to preview content.

Pokédroid

The player finds a shiny Zubat in Pokémon Fire...

Image via Wikipedia

A few days ago I received word the Pokédex application known as Pokédroid has been taken off of the Android Market. I remember when I first got my Nexus One (N1) in July of 2010, it seemed like one of the coolest apps ever. However the N1 has limited internal storage to the tune of 512MB, and only 180MB are usable since it needs some space to store the OS, but I digress. Space was at a premium so I uninstalled the app and installed ones I thought more important.

Not even a year later, The Pokemon Company decides to cry foul on one of the top apps on the Android Market, Pokédroid. They cried trademark violation and that this Pokédex application (among many others) wasn’t considered “fair use” under the DMCA*. As I look more into Pokédroid, I find a talented developer quaffed down by “the man” in an effort to push their own free product independent of him. They would hear nothing of cooperation on the app, merely that he would stop development on it.

Outraged, I scour the file sharing sites in hopes that I can find a backup somewhere**. Finally I stumble upon reddit discussion with links to personal backups of everything the developer released at last update. It was a miracle and I immediately installed it on my phone. Several things changed since I last used this app, including adding the latest generation of Pokémon (Black/White). This app had over 450,000 individual downloads in its lifetime and numerous users were heartbroken on its removal. I had to do something.

Even now as I type this sentence out, I find it tragic that the author didn’t open up the source code to the public. I’ll soon be asking him about requesting the official source code, though I have a plan on decompiling the application as it is. Would anyone be interested in seeing this project continue?

The developer’s blog has the rest of the story complete with outraged comments from Pokéfans.

** This is not an admission of piracy since the application (while normally available) was free and I have it on good faith that it is fair use of the Pokémon trademark. If you are a legal representative for Nintendo, Game Freak, Creatures inc., or anyone else currently laying claim to the Pokémon trademark, feel free to contact me regarding why it is not fair use.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.